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The evolutionary relationship between the bull thorn acacia and a species of stinging ant

BCHS Biology Hipp 2015: Chapter 11 (11

when evolution splits one species into a number of different species, each adapted to a different environment _______ describes the evolutionary relationship between the bull-thorn acacia and a species of stinging ant The most famous ant plant is the Bull Thorn Acacia, Acacia sphaerocephala. This mimosa relative has large, hollow thorns borne in pairs on the trunk and branches, and produces special protein bodies on its leaves. In the wild, a species of slender, stinging ants use the thorns as living quarters and eat the food bodies In other cases, coevolution is the result of competition between species. Beneficial Relationships One example of a beneficial relationship is the coevolution of a plant species called the bull-thorn acacia and a species of stinging ant. The acacia plant has large hollow thorns in which the ants live. The ants also feed on the plant's nectar*

It has also been observed that a single ant colony can spread over several bullhorn acacias. In Africa, a similar mutualism occurs between the Whistling Thorn acacia, Acacia drepanolobium, and ants from the species Crematogaster mimosae. Bullhorn Acacia and Its Ants In the Acacia species associated with ants, these thorns have become very large and swollen, resembling a pair of bull's horns. A specific species of stinging ants in the genus Pseudomyrmex has evolved as an obligate mutualist of these acacias Beneficial RelationshipsOne example of a beneficial relationship is the coevolution of a plant species called the bull-thorn acacia and a species of stinging ant. The acacia plant has large hollow thorns in which the ants live. The ants also feed on the plant's nectar The acacia and the ants share an evolutionary history. The hollow thorns and nectar-producing leaves of the acacia and the stinging of the ants have evolved due to the relationship between the two species. Relatives of these species that are not involved in this type of relationship do not have these traits

The acacia and the ants share an evolutionary history. The hollow thorns and nectar-producing leaves of the acacia and the stinging of the ants have evolved due to the relationship between the two species. Close relatives of these species that are not involved in this type of relationship do not have these traits 11.6 Patterns in Evolution download Report Comment

Although this relationship may seem to be a simple cooperation between two species, it is much more than that. The acacia and the ants share an evolutionary history. The hollow thorns and nectar-producing leaves of the acacia and the stinging of the ants have evolved due to the relationship between the two species The acacia ant (Pseudomyrmex ferruginea) is an obligate plant ant that protects at least five species of Acacia from preying insects and from other plants competing for sunlight, and the tree provides nourishment and shelter for the ant and its larvae. See also. Aposymbiotic; Cheating (biology) Human Microbiome Projec Pseudomyrmex ant on bull thorn acacia (Vachellia cornigera) with Beltian bodies that provide the ants with protein The acacia ant ( Pseudomyrmex ferruginea ) is an obligate plant ant that protects at least five species of Acacia ( Vachellia ) [lower-alpha 1] from preying insects and from other plants competing for sunlight, and the tree.

Bull Thorn Acacia Houston Museum Of Natural Scienc

Herbivorous Anemone has A relationship between two species that limpets feed on the algae, while carnivorous stinging tentacles benefits both is known as mutualism. Worker starfish feed on limpets, mussels, and other to catch small ants feed on the sticky secretions produced animals shellfish that are attached to the rocks Ant-plant mutualism is not rare with at least 100 other species of plants and ants exhibiting this relationship [5]. Not only can the acacia trees grow faster without any threat from insects, herbivores, and other plants, but the ants can also develop with a plentiful source of nutrition and shelter Biology Chapter 11 Section 6: Patterns In Evolution. This is a quiz that tests your knowledge on everything that is related with the patterns in evolution. Preferably, please take a look at our presentation and then try solving the quiz. This quiz contains potential test questions given by the instructor, as well as other intriguing questions. Acacia trees of Central America, for example, may have evolved hollow thorns for acacia ants to live. The ants, in turn, likely developed defensive behaviors— such as swarming and stinging —to.

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11.6 Patterns in Evolution - Studyre

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Biology Chapter 11 Section 6: Patterns In Evolution

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SBS-2021 (Day1) Context dependent evolution of the African ant acacia and its multitude of symbionts

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